READING JOURNAL / WORKSHOP NOTES: The Translocal Neighbourhood with Michael Bowdidge

Reading: Katherine Brickell and Ayona Datta(2011) Translocal Geographies – Spaces, Places, Connections
. . .
\chapter 1 – introduction : translocal geographies
real and imagined
            boundaries and territories
translocality
             as mode of human agency and mobility
                             across nations, regions, cities, neighbourhoods,
                                              buildings
and bodies
. . .

\chapter 5 – translocal geographies of london: belonging and ‘otherness’ among polish migrants after 2004 (peter & gabrielle)

i can relate to the feeling of “otherness” and longing for a sense of belonging in far away places… it’s a basic human need to feel a sense of belonging and acceptance when i lived abroad in 1984/85 local residents of an area have expressed resentment towards me . . . . .
\theory of the dérive
d
de
der
déri
dériv
dérive
dériv
déri
dér
d
: : : : : : : :
: : : : : : : : :
READINGS
Katherine Brickell and Ayona Datta(2011) Translocal Geographies – Spaces, Places, Connections Guy Debord (1956 ) Theory of the Dérive (Excerpt, 3 pages) Doreen Massey (2004) Part Five – A relational politics of the spatial Grant Kester (2000) Dialogical Aesthetics: A Critical Framework For Littoral Art Rachelle Viader Knowles (2017) A Translocal Approach to Dialogue Based Art  : : : : WORKSHOP NOTES : : : : At last! I finally get to take a course with Michael Bowdidge! I’m thrilled. I have heard lots of praise and admiration for MB and friends have really loved his workshops, his sense of play, spontaneity and chance – all some of my favorite invisible things as well! So here we go… : : : : SYMPOEISIS WORKSHOP DETAILS : : : : 3-day workshop The Translocal Neighbourhood with Michael Bowdidge As an institution we have constantly sought to understand and occupy spaces of liminality and in-betweenness, always responding to what we find and where we are in a spirit of optimism and openness. Given the enormous changes that the events of the last few months have brought, it now seems both urgent and necessary that we bring our creativity to bear upon one of the biggest questions that we now face as a species: How can we be together when we are apart? We do not confront this conundrum alone – thankfully there are artists and theorists who paved our way along this difficult path, whose thoughts and actions we can now experiment with and re-evaluate with a view to shining some light upon the darkness. The key idea here is the notion of translocality, which  can be understood “as an expression of “simultaneous situatedness across different locales” and “connectedness to a variety of other locales” (Brickell and Datta, 2011: 4), no matter the proximity” (Knowles, 2016: 4).  We will explore this notion in discussions and collaborative creative exercises over the course of several days, in order to survey, map and understand our translocal neighbourhood. Artists and theorists whose work we will examine include: Rachelle Viader Knowles, Jorge Luis Borges, Grant Kester, Katherine Brickell and Ayona Datta, Arjun Appandurai, Ewa Wojtowicz, Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Guy Debord, and Suzanne Lacy and Linda Pruess. This is a field that has been extensively theorised, but the implications of these theories have been explored in practice less often than might be supposed. This workshop attempts to re-address this imbalance in in an urgent and timely manner. Michael Bowdidge (PhD) is an artist who works with found objects, images and sound. He received his undergraduate degree in Fine Art from Middlesex Polytechnic in 1989, and completed his doctoral research at the University of Edinburgh in 2012. Michael works in a variety of educational contexts, which include academic and community settings. All of these activities enrich his teaching practice, and by extension, his creative output – as, for him, these two areas of endeavour are fundamentally intertwined.

SYLLABUS

“Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time.” Jorge Luis Borges As an institution we have constantly sought to understand and occupy spaces of liminality and in-betweenness, always responding to what we find and where we are in a spirit of optimism and openness. Given the enormous changes that the events of the last few months have brought, it now seems both urgent and necessary that we bring our creativity to bear upon one of the biggest questions that we now face as a species: How can we be together when we are apart? We do not confront this conundrum alone – thankfully there are artists and theorists who paved our way along this difficult path, whose thoughts and actions we can now experiment with and re-evaluate with a view to shining some light upon the darkness. The key idea here is the notion of translocality, which  can be understood “as an expression of “simultaneous situatedness across different locales” and “connectedness to a variety of other locales” (Brickell and Datta, 2011: 4), no matter the proximity” (Knowles, 2016: 4).  We will explore this notion in discussions and collaborative creative exercises over the course of several days, in order to survey, map and understand our translocal neighbourhood. Artists and theorists whose work we will examine include: Rachelle Viader Knowles, Jorge Luis Borges, Grant Kester, Katherine Brickell and Ayona Datta, Arjun Appandurai, Ewa Wojtowicz, Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz, Guy Debord, and Suzanne Lacy and Linda Pruess. This is a field that has been extensively theorised, but the implications of these theories have been explored in practice less often than might be supposed. This workshop attempts to re-address this imbalance in in an urgent and timely manner. Goals To explore the use of non-medium specific creative strategies in relation to the notion of the translocal, and in particular the register of the translocal neighbourhood (after Brickell and Datta, 2011). To achieve a general understanding of the many ways in which the notion of translocality has been brought into fruitful and productive dialogue with creative practice, and the current possibilities for further exploration of this nexus of praxes. To explore the relevance and utility of the notion of translocality as means of establishing meaningful connections across geographically distributed communities Day 1: The Translocal Neighbourhood #1 – Mapping Schedule Course introduction: course aims, course ethos and protocols (10 minutes) Short exercise #1: A Round Robin #1 (20 minutes) Class presentation and discussion of readings (1 hour) Long exercise/individual exploration #1: The Dérive (2 hours+) Undertake a derive within the neighbourhood that you live in, capture your movement and thought during this process with images/sound/video/drawing/whatever medium seems appropriate to you. Add your images/files to the shared Google Drive account. Class debriefing and sharing of materials gathered (1 hour) Please bring to class A digital image of something in your neighbourhood that captures something important about it for you. Please read for today Chapter 1 – Introduction: Translocal Geographies in Translocal Geographies by Katherine Brickell and Ayona Datta (18 pages, PDF) Theory of the Dérive (Excerpt) – Guy Debord (3 pages, PDF) . . . . . . . Day 2: The Translocal Neighbourhood #2 – Connecting Schedule Short exercise #2: A Round Robin #2 (20 minutes) Class presentation and discussion of readings (1 hour) Long exercise/exploration #2: Making Connections (2 hours+) Working either individually, in pairs or in a larger group, begin to work on bringing together/juxtaposing/combining the materials that we gathered yesterday during our Dérives to create new images/sounds/artworks that speak to our shared commonalities and differences. This may occur by finding ways to allow these traces of other neighbourhoods to manifest in your own neighbourhood, and then recapturing that manifestation, or by bringing these materials into other forms of dialogue.  Again, share your results into the project Google Drive when you are done. Class debriefing and sharing of the day’s work (1 hour) Please read for today (Please note that I’ve divided up the readings amongst you as follows, to ‘spread the load’ a little 🙂 Gabrielle & Peter:  Translocal Geographies, Chapter 5 – Translocal Geographies of London: Belonging and ‘Otherness’ among Polish Migrants after 2004, Ayona Datta (19 pages, PDF supplied in Day one’s readings) Rudi & Sarah Jane: Translocal Geographies, Chapter 6 – ‘You wouldn’t know what’s in there would you?’ Homeliness and ‘Foreign’ Signs in Ashfield, Sydney, Amanda Wise (16 pages, PDF supplied in Day one’s readings) Sheila & Syowia: Translocal Geographies, Chapter 7 – Ways Out of Crisis in Buenos Aires: Translocal Landscapes and the Activation of Mobile Resources, Ryan Centner (18 pages, PDF supplied in Day one’s readings) Please bring to class 20 individual words that each capture something about your neighbourhood for you. Please list them alphabetically on a piece of paper . . . . . . Day 3: The Translocal Neighbourhood #3 – BUILDing Short exercise #3: A Round Robin #3 (20 minutes) Class presentation/discussion(1 hour) Long exercise/exploration #3: The Map is The Territory (2 hours+) Schedule Working either individually, in pairs or in a larger group, we’ll work together to find a final form for our map of our translocal neighbourhood, stitching together and interweaving the various fragments and entanglements that we have worked on over the past couple of days Class debriefing and sharing of the day’s work with guest Rachelle Viader Knowles (tbc)( (1 hour) Please read for today Doreen Massey (2004) Part Five – A relational politics of the spatial in For Space (18 pages, PDF ) – – – – – – –
Readings Excerpted chapters as indicated above from: Katherine Brickell and Ayona Datta(2011) Translocal Geographies – Spaces, Places, Connections (PDF supplied) GS: Ch. 1 & Ch. 5 All of the following: Guy Debord (1956 ) Theory of the Dérive (Excerpt, 3 pages, PDF supplied) Doreen Massey (2004) Part Five – A relational politics of the spatial in For Space (18 pages, PDF supplied) Suggested additional readings Grant Kester (2000) Dialogical Aesthetics: A Critical Framework For Littoral Art (available at http://www.variant.org.uk/9texts/KesterSupplement.html) Rachelle Viader Knowles (2017) A Translocal Approach to Dialogue Based Art (PDF) The rest of: Katherine Brickell and Ayona Datta(2011) Translocal Geographies – Spaces, Places, Connections (PDF supplied) Special equipment and other needs for your class Any portable equipment or items which you normally find useful in your practice.

READING JOURNAL / WORKSHOP NOTES: The Unambitious Stripper with Isabel Lewis

Male / Female Gaze

Outward / Inward Gaze

Object / Subject

Patriarchy / Equality

I’m pretty hyped to be looking forward to a workshop with Isabel Lewis. Her work resonates a great deal with my own practice, as it is about creating immersive occasions where the artist/performer is not on a stage but actually sharing space with the audience.

Hers is an environment that activates all the senses – sight, sound, smell, touch and often taste. The experience of gathering – for her immersive occasions, creates a shared experience where a social bond is formed.

Moving within the space and among the participants – dancing/moving, singing, speaking – the energy and dynamics are shifted by what she brings to the space in the performance. Her gatherings are designed and choreographed with care and with love. All necessary for approaching peace.

Bringing the female gaze to cinema as Celine Sciamma did in her film, Portrait of a Lady on Fire offers a revolutionary way of looking at relationships as a more erotic sociability that is based on an authentic foundation of equality, care and harmony.

. . . . .

. . . . .

WORKSHOP SYLLABUS: ISABEL LEWIS

Unambitious Stripper with Isabel Lewis
Departing from feminist sociologist Roslyn Wallach Bologh’s notion of “erotic sociability” as a form of interhuman sociality and an alternative to relational modes of competition, conflict, and coercion, this workshop will focus on the tuning and heightening of the senses in order to facilitate a state of hyper-presence that will be the aid towards generative and affective forms of being and dancing together, with and for one another. The figure of an unambitious stripper serves as a guide to connecting with our inner worlds in order to become more radically receptive to our outer worlds.

“Unambitiousness” is central to this investigation. The outward-oriented gaze that typically reaches out to address and arrest the viewer is turned in on the self in this scenario. Within each of our immediate kinespheres, looking at the surfaces of our own skin, sending the gaze further inward through the epidermis and into our fleshy insides a dance will emerge that, firstly given to oneself, can be offered to the other. This workshop uses guided imaginative exercises combined with playful physicality to approach and reconnect with the human and nonhuman presences we share space with. In this workshop dance is a doing and undoing of oneself in relation to the other. We will move along a continuum of becoming an object of interest and desire and being drawn out as an interested and desiring subject.

We will talk about risk, support, safety, freedom, entanglement, surprises, multiplicity, complexity, the future…We will at times alternately watch and perform for one another. We will be generous and kind to ourselves and one another.

Course goals:
-Arriving at a general understanding of the central thesis of Bologh’s book “Love or Greatness” and her analysis of 20th century forms of sociability.

-Establishing a strong theoretical basis for ethical sociable interhuman relations using Bologh’s notion of “erotic sociability”

-Arriving at a reflected understanding of the structural elements of performance format that is the strip dance.

-Applying and working with an expanded notion of strip dancing that incorporates self-reflexivity and unambitiousness.

-Coming away from the class with the experience of having integrating the theoretical work into a bodily practice, feeling theory.

Required Readings:
Selected excerpts from Roslyn Wallach Bologh’s “Love and Greatness”.
Pages 213-219; 224-239 PDF Pages 300-327 PDF

Suggested Readings:
An interview that gives a sense of my artistic approach:https://tankmagazine.com/tank/2019/talks/isabel-lewis/